Off to a great start — if you’ve got the “same daddy”

Robert Bentley, the new governor of Alabama, didn’t just kick off his swearing-in ceremony yesterday. Bentley, a longtime deacon at First Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa, also kicked a good percentage of his state’s residents off his list as constituents worthy of respect and equal treatment from his administration.

Addressing a large crowd at Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church — where Rev. Marin Luther King, Jr. once preached, Bentley declared “There may be some people here today who do not have living within them the Holy Spirit. If you have been adopted in God’s family like I have, and like you have if you’re a Christian and if you’re saved, and the Holy Spirit lives within you just like the Holy Spirit lives within me, then you know what that makes? It makes you and me brothers. And it makes you and me brother and sister,” according to this report in the Birmingham News.

Bentley added, ”Now I will have to say that, if we don’t have the same daddy, we’re not brothers and sisters. So anybody here today who has not accepted Jesus Christ as their savior, I’m telling you, you’re not my brother and you’re not my sister, and I want to be your brother.”

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2000 figures, 84% of the Bible belt state identified as Christian. That leaves 16% of Alabamans fatherless and out in the cold.

10 Responses to Off to a great start — if you’ve got the “same daddy”

  1. Matt DeGennaro says:

    I’m a Christian and a Republican and have no trouble saying this small minded man is an embarrassment.

  2. American Dad says:

    Gov. Bentley is too crass to realize it, but he is making all Christians look absurd. As a Christian I reject his foolish comments.

  3. Maggie says:

    I guess this Baptist preacher forgot that his “daddy” was Jewish.

  4. Hometown Guy says:

    I wonder if a recall has been mounted against this fool of a governor yet? I’ll send a donation to get it rolling!

  5. Strays says:

    Where the preamble declares, that coercion is a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion, an amendment was proposed by inserting “Jesus Christ,” so that it would read “A departure from the plan of Jesus Christ, the holy author of our religion;” the insertion was rejected by the great majority, in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of its protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mohammedan, the Hindoo and Infidel of every denomination.
    -Thomas Jefferson, Autobiography, in reference to the Virginia Act for Religious Freedom

    But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.
    -Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, 1782

    I never submitted the whole system of my opinions to the creed of any party of men whatever in religion, in philosophy, in politics, or in anything else where I was capable of thinking for myself. Such an addiction is the last degradation of a free and moral agent.
    -Thomas Jefferson, letter to Francis Hopkinson, March 13, 1789

    History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil government. This marks the lowest grade of ignorance of which their civil as well as religious leaders will always avail themselves for their own purposes.
    -Thomas Jefferson to Alexander von Humboldt, Dec. 6, 1813.

    BELIEVING WITH YOU THAT RELIGION IS A MATTER WHICH LIES SOLELY BETWEEN MAN AND HIS GOD, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legislative powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should ‘make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,’ thus building a wall of separation between church and State.
    -Thomas Jefferson, letter to Danbury Baptist Association, CT., Jan. 1, 1802

    ——

    That disgraceful Alabama Republican is not worthy being counted amongst the Conservatives.

  6. Sally Forth says:

    I just clicked on this guy’s photo linked under his name. He looks like the kind of arrogant jerk who would utter these comments. Wonder what kind of teaching came from his pulpit? It pains me to think.

  7. GodToVerse says:

    A depressing statement. Would that more politicians made headlines by being reasonable instead.

    Strays — thank you for the lovely quotes from perhaps America’s greatest Founding Father.

  8. Chuck says:

    On the link to his site, this goonish governor says he has “carefully selected a team that shares my vision.” That, in and of itself, is frightening.

  9. sherriaz says:

    As a Christian, had he stipulated that he was speaking of brothers and sisters IN CHRIST and the sharing of a religious faith, I could have understood his intent a little better. He should have stopped after that- he was, after all, addressing people within a church. He appears to have made a really clumsy attempt at the Great Commission to which Christ called all his people: spreading the Gospel. But it was hardly the place and time, and inappropriate as an elected official to use that forum. Billy Graham this guy is not.

    As an elected official, he needs to embrace ALL of his constituents, although he does not share the same faith with all of them. Example; Muslims would not be his brothers in the spiritual sense. Brothers and sisters IN CHRIST are distinctive, but that does not exclude addressing those of differing faiths within the human brotherhood.

  10. Republican Voter says:

    As an elected official his personal religious beliefs have no relevance. For him to make this comments displays his ignorance. If Arizonans thought they had a loose cannon in the governor’s office when the late Gov. Evan Mecham opened his mouth, those memories will be small potatoes compared to this foolish man. He should have stayed a deacon in his church and preached to his heart’s content. When he decided to run for governor, he lost his religious bully pulpit.