Reminder: March 1, 2012 GOP debate cancelled

February 26, 2012

Political watchers reminder: CNN has canceled its March 1, Republican presidential debate scheduled in Georgia after three of four candidates have declined to participate, citing busy campaign schedules leading to Super Tuesday on March 6.

The candidates — Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum –have participated in 20 debates, including the one this past Wednesday in Mesa, Arizona.

(View the Arizona debate in its entirety here.)

“Mitt Romney and Ron Paul told the Georgia Republican Party, Ohio Republican Party, and CNN Thursday that they will not participate in the March 1 Republican presidential primary debate,” CNN said in a statement. “Without full participation of all four candidates, CNN will not move forward with the Super Tuesday debate.”

Rick Santorum also said he would not participate, leaving only Newt Gingrich committed to attending in his home state.

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First of session PAChyderm legislative scorecard

February 26, 2012

The PAChyderm Coalition, a Reagan Republican organization, has released its latest cumulative evaluations of legislators.

This list reflects legislative actions as of 2/17/2012. It was last updated 2/24/2012. Scroll down to see the bills used in the evaluations and the summary of criteria used to weight bills.

Howard Levine’s narrative for the 2012 session follows:

We have been working with Republican legislators to refine the bill weights. The have had private access to our proposed weights prior to our publication of them. The number of bills being tracked is 173 plus 37 bills that have strike all amendments. There are a lot of legislators with high scores including many representatives who have +100% ratings!

Although we are well into the session, there are still many floor votes as well as committee votes to come. The scores currently are still heavily influenced by bill sponsorships compared to floor and committee votes, but, as more votes are taken, they will have an increasing impact on the scores as the session continues.

We have tightened up the categorization we apply to the scores. Reagan Republican and RINO have stayed the same, the Bipartisan Republican score range has expanded, and the other categories have higher score values with narrower ranges.

Grades can range from +100% (supports Republican principles) to -100% (opposes Republican principles) Ratings will be updated on a weekly basis. Please refer to our FAQs section located after the strike all bills. It responds to some of the questions we have been getting regarding the grades assigned.

Rank for legislators with the same Grade is determined by bill sponsorship and votes cast. For example, a legislator with 3 committee votes would get a better rank than one with 2 committee votes if they have the same Grade. Legislators are assigned to a Group based on their latest rating. Note that these have changed from last year.


Gov. Brewer endorses Romney, skips WH dinner

February 26, 2012

“He’s our man!”

Gov. Jan Brewer in Washington, D.C. for the National Governors Association (NGC) conference, will skip the Obama’s White House Black-tie dinner soiree tonight. She used her time in D.C. to a different advantage, appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” to endorse GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney. “He’s the man that can carry the day and I’m going to get out there and work as hard as I can for Romney’s election,” Brewer said.

When asked yesterday whether she would attend tonight’s dinner, Gov. Brewer drolly responded, “I’m not. I’ve just decided I wasn’t going to be going because I had some other commitments I had to attend to.”

Brewer, who dined at the White House last year and will attend the policy discussions centered on economic issues with other governors and Obama Monday, laughed when asked to identify her scheduling conflict.

Brewer and Obama have had a stormy relationship since each took office in 2009, intensified by Obama’s decision to sue Arizona over our state’s nationally copied and widely supported law dealing with illegal immigration, known as SB 1070. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case Arizona v. United States.


Car jack used to breach AZ border fence

February 25, 2012

 A sobering reminder of our vulnerability

In this shocking video taken along the Arizona border, a group of Mexican drug smugglers use a simple car jack to lift open a portion of the border fence and deliver hundreds of pounds of illegal drugs onto American streets.

With no border patrol agents in the surrounding area, the smugglers were able to make their way into the U.S. completely undetected. So much for the “border being more secure now than it’s ever been,” as Department of Homeland INsecurity chieftain Janet Napolitano persistently boasts.

It is inconceivable that illegal aliens smuggling drugs or terror suspects intent on doing harm to our country are able to use an automotive jack to break open our border fence faster than ICE can set free “non-violent” illegal aliens.

This “fence” would be a joke if not such a serious a threat. Can the fence in your backyard be raised using an automotive jack? The fence surrounding the yard of an average American’s home is more effective than the fence protecting our nation’s southern border from terror suspects and illegal aliens flooding our neighborhoods with illicit drugs.

This U.S. Government Accountability Office report to Congress warns of an “ever-present threat of terrorist infiltration over the Southwest border.”

Chelsea Schilling writing for WND provides a chilling account of the numerous Special-interest countries’ and ‘sponsors of terror’ including Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Pakistan, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen, whose nationals make their way into the U.S. through the porous border that remains unsecured under the Obama administration.


TIME Magazine’s racially charged article misidentifies AZ Republic photog

February 24, 2012

Magazine cover asserts Latinos will decide next President

In advance of Arizona’s GOP primary this coming Tuesday, Time Magazine features a cover story titled “Yo Decido. Why Latinos Will Pick The Next President,” depicting images of Latino voters.

Maybe.

According to New York Magazine at least one person photographed for the cover does not identify himself as Latino at all. In fact, Michael Schennum is half Chinese and half white. (He is in the top row just behind the letter “M.”)  “They never told me what it was for or asked if I was Latino,” said Schennum — who just happens to be employed as a staff photographer for the left-leaning Periódico de la República de Arizona (Arizona Republic).

According to the magazine, their photographer Marco Grob spent a weekend in February “chronicling Latino voters in Phoenix, Arizona.”

Time Magazine told New York Magazine, “We took steps to ensure that everyone self-identified as Latino, that they are registered voters, and that they would be willing to answer our questions. If there was a misunderstanding with one of our subjects, we apologize.”

The cover story claims that the Latino vote has grown in certain parts of the country giving the group the ability to reelect Barack Obama in 2012. Saying new voters in the Southwest are largely Latino, and that if Obama is able to win “heavily-Latino Western states like Nevada, Colorado and Arizona,” he would be able to afford losing industrial Midwestern states like Ohio and Wisconsin. How racially charged is that?

Carefully omitted in the exceedingly biased report is Hispanic disenchantment with Obama for not carrying through on his 2008 election promise of instituting a pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens within 90 days of his election. At the time Obama called “immigration reform” — more accurately known as ‘amnesty’ — a “top priority for the country.”

Spanish language Univision even uses the Time article to issue a threat: “Politicians, you’ve been warned,” it cautions.

The cover story’s author Michael Sherer actually calls it an “awkward coincidence” that the last of the Republican debates is occurring in Arizona– a state known for its “controversial immigration laws.”

He’s no doubt referring to Arizona’s popular and nationally copied SB 1070.


Making the case for Romney

February 24, 2012

“Most conservative candidate we’ve run for president since Reagan”

Reliably conservative political pundit Ann Coulter asks,”What’s their problem with Romney?”

Read her cogent column here.

Then pay Mitt Romney a visit.

UPDATE:

Today’s newly released Rasmussen Report survey shows Mitt Romney has widened his lead —  42% to 29% — over leading challenger Rick Santorum in the Arizona Republican Primary race, with the vote just four days away.

The survey finds Romney up three points and Santorum down two from last week when it was a 39% to 31% race.

A poll of likely Republican primary voters in Michigan shows Romney with 40% of the vote and Rick Santorum trailing with 34%.

Both polls were conducted on Thursday night, following the last scheduled debate among the GOP candidates.

The AZ GOP debate video can be viewed in its entirety here.


Babeu: Attention even publicity hounds don’t crave

February 23, 2012

Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu’s sordid saga of sodomy, unrequited love and a threat-laced jilting has been making news around the country. From Florida’s Miami Herald to the San Francisco Chronicle, national outlets are reporting that Arizona’s Attorney General Tom Horne has designated Solicitor General Dave Cole to head an investigation into allegations that Babeu abused his power. Horne announced that he’ll recuse himself from the probe since he and Babeu have been political allies in the past.

Babeu, known for his insatiable appetite for publicity, is currently running for Congress in Arizona’s new 4th District. He has requested an investigation into allegations made against him and his office. Last weekend, Babeu acknowledged his homosexuality after Jose Orozco, a Mexican national and former lover, alleged he was threatened with deportation if he ever exposed their relationship.

Babeu was a no show at the Pinal County Board of Supervisors budget meeting yesterday.