Jeff Flake’s new career move revealed

December 2, 2018

The Arizona Daily Independent (ADI) newspaper has used SRA’s sobering recent post, titled, “Narcissist Jeff Flake continues to scam Republicans,” as a basis for its spot-on Sunday Comic.

The clever cartoon is an illustration masterpiece, guaranteed to elicit a much needed weekend chuckle on the heels of lame-duck Flake’s destructive temper tantrums.

Seeing Red AZ appreciates ADI’s link to our post.

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Humor is a good thing — even when the topic is Sen. Bob Worse-ly

June 24, 2018

Our friends at the Arizona Daily Independent (ADI) have given the SRAZ post on slippery state Sen. Bob Worsley the honor of being linked to their Red Pill Sunday Comic.

Thanks to ADI for their exceptional coverage of Arizona issues as well as their timely interjections of humor.


Arizona Daily Independent provides comic relief

June 17, 2018

Thanks to the folks at Arizona Daily Independent (ADI) for once again linking their Sunday Comic to a SRAZ post.

ADI’s Red Pill Approved Comics are often based on Arizona news, which is routinely discouraging to conservatives. They have a knack for bringing hilarity to dedicated leftists such as the desperate Phil Boas, who is the editorial page editor of the failing Arizona Republic.  

Enjoy!


Infantile Jeff Flake subject of ADI cartoon

June 10, 2018

Once again SRAZ sends a “thank you” to the Arizona Daily Independent newspaper (ADI) for providing a humorous take on our recent post, “Jeff Flake: Ego-driven, delusional, loses grip on reality.”

ADI’s Sunday Comic depicts Flake as an infant in need of adult supervision, with a link to our post.


Arizona Daily Independent’s cartoon brightens Monday morning

June 4, 2018

We send our thanks to the Arizona Daily Independent (ADI) for basing its hilarious Sunday’s Comic on Seeing Red AZ’s post, “Bennett’s in the race: AZ Gov. Doug McDucey should be nervous.”

ADI depicts Arizona Republic editorial page editor Phil Boas as Captain Boas Speech Police, and provides a link to our post.  If you missed it, the humor will brighten your Monday morning.


List of 2017’s most annoying words & phrases released

December 30, 2017

Marist College notes “Whatever” loses ground but still ranks

The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion recently released its annual list of most annoying words or phrases used in casual conversation.

In the opinion of SRAZ, 2017 was a bonus year in terms of inanities. A few of our favorite misuses of the English language and general dopey words and phrases are listed below. We invite our readers to add their personal (un)favorites to our list.  Make it a fun Saturday.  Oops, there we go. Fun is a noun not an adjective. Or is it?

Topping our list is the now ubiquitous, touchy-feely “reached out,“ replacing contacted, called or asked. It has become a staple in news reports written by ASU Cronkite Journalism School student reporters now toiling for the Arizona Republic as its staff continues to dwindle through more layoffs. Example: “The investigator reached out” to (the crime victim}. 

Speaking of crimes, how does one “go missing”? What happened to “disappeared”? Go or went missing sounds as if a missing person had a plan, compete with a map, when in fact they may have been kidnapped or otherwise a victim of criminal activity — all too often the case. Go missing falls into the same new English language learner category as, “Throw Mama from the train, a kiss.”

Another strange word usage is the word “so,” now frequently used in beginning a response to a question. As an example, “How did you meet you wife?” is answered with, “So, we were sitting across from each other in Starbucks.”  What was your first job might well be answered with, “So, I worked behind the counter at McDonalds.”

Another routine bungling of language is the misuse of the pronoun “myself” when the speaker intends to say me and isn’t sure whether the correct usage is “me” or “I.”  Myself is always reflective on the speaker, as in “I went to the store by myself.”  “Myself” didn’t go to the store.

“Contact Joe or myself,” is wrong. “Contact Joe or me” is correct.

Overly descriptive teen favorites “amazing” and “awesome,” now co-opted by their parents and grandparents head the dopey list. The response to, “I’ll see you at noon,” is “awesome!” Suddenly, most grandparents have “amazing” grandchildren. What the dimpled darlings do to amaze is up to dispute. Remember when kids were simply cute or said thedarndest things“?

Give us your best shot adding to the Marist list. This could be funner than you thought.

 


Think you’ve opened all your gifts? There’s one more

December 25, 2017

 

Seeing Red AZ has a treat for you. Click here. Be sure your speakers are on.