Primary Election Day: An in-depth look at the numbers

August 28, 2018

Armed with this treasure trove of trends and info, you might have a leg up betting on the outcomes of tonight’s Arizona Primary Election.

Data Orbital describes itself in part as “a full-service data analytics and survey research firm with local, state and national experience.”

Check out its Early Voting Tracker which breaks down Arizona’s data statewide, by county, congressional, legislative districts, and even precincts — including ballots requested and returned by Republican, Democrats and Independents.

There is no more “Election Day” as we knew it, since the majority of voters have already cast their ballots by mail.

Advertisements

AZSOS Shuts Down Ken Bennett

August 23, 2018

 Ken Bennett for Governor 2018 sent out this email to supporters Thurs. Aug. 22:

Supporters: I have been shut down by the State Government but I am still fighting for you. I can still take donations to $160.00.  If you can help I very much appreciate it, you can donate here.

Be ready and watch for updates!

Despite Michele Reagan’s claims to revolutionize technology at the Secretary of State’s office the $5 Clean Elections online contribution system has not been touched in seven+ years.

The incompetency of the Secretary of State’s office to offer an up-to-date software system that works so voters can participate in Clean Election Campaign is unacceptable.  The voter’s in Arizona put CEC’s in place to take big money out of politics and allow citizen candidates to participate. Prohibiting voters to participate by providing inadequate tools is outrageous and disenfranchises the will of the voter.

August 21st at midnight was the deadline for submitting $5 qualifying contributions to the Bennett for Arizona campaign. Hundreds of people across the state were mobilized to electronically give the $5.00 donation as the Clean Elections campaign entered the final hours.

Voters have contacted the campaign in increasing numbers about a wide variety of difficulties giving online. It now appears the outcry at the problems with the AZSOS system are valid. The campaign has been informed that the system to give $5.00 has not been updated since Mr. Bennett himself put it in place seven plus years ago.

The advances in online transfers of money has changed drastically over the past seven years as well as the use of cell phones and tablets versus desktop computers to complete an array of everyday tasks. A large number of voters have told the campaign they gave up trying to complete the $5 donation on their phone and then with the online system out of frustration.

Mr. Bennett attempted to contact Eric Spencer, Director of Election Services Tuesday night when the problem was brought to his attention. The only communication the campaign received concerning the problem was a tweet addressed to (gubernatorial candidate) Ken Bennett:

“The website is up, so I very much look forward to seeing you make your filing appointment tomorrow with our office.”

The Director knew the system was not to close until midnight.

Paid for by Bennett for Arizona. Authorized by Ken Bennett


School shootings: Who’s to blame?

May 19, 2018

Another school shooting has taken the lives of what is being reported as 9 students and a teacher‘s aide. Twelve others were wounded by the 17-year-old murderer, This time the massacre was in Santa Fe Texas, a small town of approximately 80,000 residents south of Houston.

The Houston Chronicle described the assassin with these words: “He posted a photo on his Facebook page of a “born to kill” T-shirt and wrote in a journal about shooting people and committing suicide. His Facebook cover photo comes from an album called “Dangerous Days” by a dystopian cyberpunk band called Pertubator with a track that took on a haunting quality before 8 a.m. on Friday morning: “Humans Are Such Easy Prey”

The newspaper wrote, “The signs of dark, violent fantasies were ubiquitous in (the killer’s) social persona and private ramblings.”

Like the 1999 Columbine High School killers, he had a penchant for wearing a trench coat. Presenting a dichotomy of personalities, he had been an honor roll student, played on the high school football team and expressed a wholesome desire to join the Marines.

Seventeen were killed at a Parkland, Florida high school just three months ago on Valentine’s Day. This list of school shootings goes back to 1990.

The immediate reaction by many on the left is to go after guns — confiscate and destroy them. Eradicate the Second Amendment as outdated.  Blame the NRA. Then comes the talk of mandatory mental health evaluations and permitting involuntary commitments.

Lost in the mix is the undeniable fact that violence, passing as entertainment,  has for far too long, permeated our society.  Music lyrics were once taken on by Tipper Gore, then-wife of Sen. Al Gore. She testified before a senate panel in 1985, saying, “…in virtually every medium, the communications industry offers increasingly explicit images of sex and violence to younger and younger children. In the course of my work, I’ve encountered a degree of callousness toward children that I never imagined existed. No one asks what is in the product or its effect on kids, only how well it will sell.”

Her efforts to expose the encroachment were vociferously fought by the music industry. In 1985, the graphic violence was mild compared to today. According to Quora, the Internet “became mainstream among researchers by 1989, among Silicon Valley movers and shakers by mid 1995, and by most US households by 2001.”

In 2018, many children are isolated, unsupervised and fatherless. The Internet provides them with explicit images and social media sites to “express themselves.”  Their entertainment is raw and often violent.  Fewer families than ever before are involved in a faith-based community. Values are no longer taught. Parents increasingly put their own pursuits ahead of their children. These are the areas that beg for attention, since they create the personalities that revel in violence.

Families owned firearms throughout our history and mass shootings were not perpetrated at schools by adolescents. The cause is too uncomfortable to address, but it’s time to remind parents that their children are their primary responsibility. Economic pressure must be applied to the entertainment and music industries. The NRA, which protects freedom, is not the problem.


Dying AZ Republic continues to insult readers

November 13, 2017

Over the years, we’ve written about the failing, intelligence-insulting local newspaper. On this lovely autumn morning when many of us might be inclined to forgive many overreaches, let us remind you why the Hillary-endorsing, amnesty-supporting rag is not worth your time or money.

Today’s edition contains only three + pages of opinion passing itself off as news. These efforts are  tucked in among multiple full page ads for hearing aids, along with knee braces and dentures for its aged reader demographic. AP and USA Today handle whatever “heavy lifting” there is. The lone columnist quotes Democrat strategists who are putting together a ballot initiative which would be a constitutional amendment to limit free speech in elections. Her effort is titled, “Want to find out who is buying our elections?”

The editorial by Linda Valdez’ encroaching replacement Elvia Diaz is headlined, “Will love for Mexico save NAFTA.” It is on the same page masquerading as “Opinions” that headlines, “Republican Party of louts and dunces.”

There is a total of four lockstep letters to the editor, under an anti-Republican cartoon, most often Trump-thumping. They are titled: “Failing again to understand supporters of Donald Trump,” followed by “Arizona is fortunate to have men like Jeff Flake and John McCain.” Next contains a threat to conservative Arizona U.S. Reps. Andy Biggs and Trent Franks, titled, “We will remember the Republicans who turned on Robert Mueller.” The final letter compliments the newspaper’s publisher on her editorial intended to remove a GOP state lawmaker.

As usual, there is a front page box inviting remaining readers to “Go deeper with digital.” The newspaper, which often repeats the same article twice in a single edition, uses ASU Cronkite student reporters and lacks editors. Most of its seasoned reporters took the desperation buy-out offers and left a few years ago.  It can no longer continue to stay afloat buying newsprint and ink while keeping what’s left of home deliveries and drop-offs at convenience marts.

The Daily Insult’s only immediate path to survival is going entirely online where it will compete with multitudes of more reliable news sources and eventually turn up its toes. The left-wing Arizona Republic, which actually referred to itself as conservative when endorsing Hillary Clinton for president, has written its own obituary.


Hero or Goat? Typifying the liberal quandary

July 30, 2017

Though deeply entrenched in the digital world, there remains an enigmatic appeal to holding a book or magazine in our hands and turning pages. This explains why the arrival of the conservative Weekly Standard in the mailbox each week is such a pleasure.

The magazine runs the gamut from serious commentary, analysis of the news to dashes of humor. Today we bring you the humor, which we all so richly deserve after the antics that dominated the news this past week. This selection is from The Scrapbook:

Hero or Goat?

The latest threat to the American workforce has arrived, and it’s on four hooves.

A public-employee union is up in arms over a team of blue-collar billy-goats employed to clear brush on a college campus. The union claims that by using the animals, Western Michigan University is snatching jobs away from union workers. They’re not kidding around, either—the union has filed a grievance against the university. Their complaint is a sort of inversion of Orwell’s Animal Farm motto: Two legs good, four legs ba-a-a-a-ad.

What’s particularly delightful about this conflict is how it pits two key leftist enterprises—public-employee unions and college environmentalists—against one another. After all, the reason Western Michigan University chose goat grazers in the first place was concern for the environment. Eschewing chemicals, the college instead opted for the green solution, hiring a team of 20 goats to clear 10 acres of rough bramble and poison ivy. Last year a trip of 10 goats proved efficient and sustainable, and the current flock is ahead of schedule.

Alas, such environmental considerations weren’t enough to pacify the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The union was quick to leap to the defense of its members in the face of the ruminant menace.

And just how great is that menace? The Washington Post did the math and found that in one month, one person with a tractor can do the work of 3,600 goats. Even if all 2.5 million goats in the United States were employed, they would only threaten 347 full-time human jobs nationwide.

Small as that number may be (and it’s nothing compared with the threat posed by automated robot goats), it’s not nonexistent, which leaves leftists with a dilemma. It seems to The Scrapbook that there is an obvious compromise that would satisfy all parties: The goats should unionize.


Global Cyber attack likely to be repeated Monday

May 14, 2017

The international cyber attack that hit at least 200,000 victims in 150 countries on Friday, could be repeated on Monday and into the week, according to Europol Director Rob Wainwright. He issued the warning on a Sunday program, describing the global reach as “unprecedented,” with the ability to paralyze governments, rail lines, hospitals and other essential services.

Reuters news agency has more here.


Keep your eye on the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office

April 30, 2017

It was obvious there’d be more to the story when it was announced that newly elected Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes’ chief of staff Mike Schiller resigned his job after fewer than four months on the job.

The reason?  It’s that reliable “family” fallback again. Schilller who has commuted back and forth from Ohio for years as a “business consultant,” suddenly found the status quo unacceptable, saying the new job kept him from spending time with his wife — causing him to “unexpectedly“ resign. He made sure to announce there was “no animus” between him and Fontes.

Why now?

The answer comes in the form of Matt Morales, appointed the new chief of staff. 

Following the retirement of longtime Elections Director Karen Osborne, Fontes supposedly conducted a nationwide search for a replacement, rather than promoting from within the office that functions in tandem with the Recorder’s Office.

Under the decades long leadership of Republican County Recorder, Helen Purcell, the Elections Director was Democrat Karen Osborne. They worked hand-in-glove, doing their jobs without interjecting a partisan agenda.

That won’t be the case going forward.

Fontes, who intends do away with polling places, has appointed a chief of staff who leaves no doubt as to trend the office is taking, Although Matt Morales ran as a Republican 2016 state House Primary candidate in Legislative District 28, he had no viable footprint in the district and his website lacked an issues page or any information about him, only a vague and rambling statement of his love of Arizona. Morales’ financial contributors were McCain cronies, including beer heiress Cindy Hensley McCain’s Hensley & Co. honchos and lobbyists. He lost.

Now Matt Morales is the new chief of staff at the Recorder’s Office, the office relied upon for overseeing the integrity of the voting system in Maricopa County.